Monday, September 19, 2011

So with all the talk of “Scrappy” players on BleacherNation.com and commentor - philoe beddoe (and I hope his orangutan) wonderful“All-Time Crype Team” I wanted to start the Chicago Cub’s “All-Time Scrappy Team.”

Chicago Cubs “All-Time Scrappy Team”

So what does it mean to be “scrappy?” According to Merriam Webster:

scrap·py - adj
1. Consisting of disorganized, untidy, or incomplete parts.
2. Determined, argumentative, or pugnacious.

I think Merriam Webster is perfect in the definition and really describes what a “scrappy” player looks like (especially the incomplete part definition), but let me refine toward baseball terms

scrap·py - adj
1. A Chicago Cub player that demonstrates hustle, shows flashes of potential, often speedy, but lacks the stats to be an everyday player.
2. A Cub player that becomes a fan favorite, and one that fans adamantly want to be named a starter, regardless of supporting stats.
3. Typically caucasian or appears caucasian from a distance. (sad but true)
4. Even in failure, and documented stats to support failure, maintains status as a fan favorite.
5. Becomes an unrecognizable player to anyone outside of Cub Nation

So for this inaugural “All-Time Scrappy Team” I select the first player I remember getting this kind of Scrappy Love.
Doug Dascenzo

From Wikipedia:
Drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 12th round of the 1985 MLB amateur draft, Dascenzo would make his Major League Baseball debut with theChicago Cubs on September 2, 1988, and appear in his final game on September 29, 1996.

Dascenzo began his Major League career by playing in a then-National League record 241 consecutive games without making an error. The streak spanned from his debut in 1988 to the 1991 season when he committed his first error in a game on August 25.
During the 1990 and 1991 seasons with the Chicago Cubs, Dascenzo made a total of four appearances as a relief pitcher. He pitched for a total of five innings, giving up three hits, two bases on balls, and achieving two strike outs.

Dascenzo ended his career as a member of the San Diego Padres organization after the 1996 season and took a job with the team as a roving minor league instructor. He made his managerial debut with the Padres' Northwest League affiliate, the Eugene Emeralds, in 2006 where he guided the Ems to a 43-33 finish. He was promoted to manage the Fort Wayne Wizards in the Midwest League in 2007. He led the team to the Midwest League championship in the 2009 season, after they swept the Burlington Bees, 3-0.[1]

On December 1, 2009, Dascenzo was named the manager of the Double-A San Antonio Missions of the Texas League.

A look at his career stats and his season as a “starter” shows what a “scrappy” player looks like:

Career Stats – 7 Seasons
G
PA
AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
SB
CS
BB
SO
BA
OBP
SLG
OPS
540
1362
1225
156
287
42
10
5
90
49
26
103
117
.234
.293
.297
.590
1992 Season
G
PA
AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
SB
CS
BB
SO
BA
OBP
SLG
OPS
139
409
376
37
96
13
4
0
20
6
8
27
32
.255
.304
.311
139

What I remember the most about Dascenzo was that he actually pitched a couple of innings, and I watched half of those games since only pitched 4 games and 5 innings between the 1990 and 91 seasons; however, what I didn’t realize is that he was nearly perfect!

In those 5 IP, Doug had zero earned runs, 5 hits, 2 BB, 2 SO, for a WHIP of 1.000.

Outside of his pitching, I don’t have a ton of memories; however, I can remember friends and family at the time really wanting to see him be an everyday player from the moment he arrived, and as his stats show— he’s just not an everyday starter.  

So why do I remember him?  It has to be the power of Scrappy Love.  These scrappy players are not failed prospects, yet they continue to be in the collective consciousness of Cub fans.  

So if you have any insight on Dougie, or a suggestion for a future member of the “All-Scrappy Team” please let me know.

2 comments:

  1. What a blog..did you run out of content or just views?

    ReplyDelete